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Article
September 1986

Outpatient Cataract Surgery

Arch Ophthalmol. 1986;104(9):1274. doi:10.1001/archopht.1986.01050210028008

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Abstract

To the Editor.  —In 1946, I was discharged from the US Army to join Dr Conrad Berens in New York City, only to find that Dr Berens had had a heart attack and I was expected to hold down his practice until he recovered. One of the ophthalmologists to whom I turned for help in difficult decisions was Dr Henry Templeton Smith, a former Texan, six feet, two inches tall, and handsome enough to be a movie star. The epitome of the Park Avenue physician, Dr Smith dressed beautifully, always wore a fresh flower in his buttonhole, and was not only a fine man but an excellent ophthalmic surgeon. He completely awed me by his quick, sutureless intracapsular cataract extractions. After retrobulbar and Van Lint akinesia, he would make a Graefe's section, many times including a sector iridectomy and a small conjunctival flap. The lens was delivered by pressure or

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