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Article
September 1987

An Update on the Accreditation of Graduate Education in Ophthalmology

Arch Ophthalmol. 1987;105(9):1189-1194. doi:10.1001/archopht.1987.01060090047024
Abstract

• Educational standards for residency training in ophthalmology are established by a nine-member committee whose members represent the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the American Medical Association, and the American Board of Ophthalmology. Residency programs are reviewed to see that they meet these standards and are accredited if they do. Over the past 11 years, the accreditation status of a total of 445 programs was reviewed: 19 programs lost accreditation (nine withdrew voluntarily), 52 programs were placed on probation or were continued on probation, 310 programs were granted full accreditation or continued accreditation, and 15 of 20 applicants were granted provisional accreditation. During this time, the Residency Review Committee for Ophthalmology on two occasions modified the "Special Requirements for Residency Training in Ophthalmology." In addition, an appeals process was instituted by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education to give program directors the opportunity to appeal adverse accreditation decisions. There is evidence that this system has had an overall beneficial effect on residency training in ophthalmology in the United States.

References
1.
Trobe J, Fraunfelder FT, Jones DB, et al:  Monitoring ophthalmology graduate education: The Residency Review Committee . Arch Ophthalmol 1982;100:67-71.Article
2.
Directory of Residency Training Programs, 1986-87 . Chicago, American Medical Association, 1986.
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