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Article
January 1995

Intraocular Sustained Drug Release Devices

Author Affiliations

San Francisco, Calif

Arch Ophthalmol. 1995;113(1):25-26. doi:10.1001/archopht.1995.01100010027016

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Abstract

The article on treatment of cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis with an intraocular sustained-release ganciclovir implant by Martin et al1 in the December 1994 issue of the Archives represents an important breakthrough. Past studies indicate that CMV retinitis occurs in 20% to 25% of all persons with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS); Douglass Jabs, MD, chair of the National Eye Institute Study of Ocular Complications of AIDS, estimated at a recent meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology that that figure is now approaching 50%, as medical advances are allowing patients to live longer with severely depressed CD4 cell counts. Dr Jabs stated that CMV retinitis is now the most common intraocular infection seen in large urban centers. This is thus a major problem, and the costs of present medical therapy with an indwelling venous catheter are huge, estimated at approximately $70 000 per year per patient. Statistics do not tell

References
1.
Martin DF, Parks DJ, Mellow SD, et al.  Treatment of cytomegalovirus retinitis with an intraocular sustained-release ganciclovir implant: a randomized controlled clinical trial . Arch Ophthalmol . 1994;112:1531-1539.Article
2.
Spector SA, McKinley G, Drew WL, Stempien MJ, for the Syntex Ganciclovir Study Group. A randomized, double-blind study of the efficacy and safety of oral ganciclovir for the prevention of cytomegalovirus disease in HIV-infected persons. Presented at the 34th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy; October 11, 1994; New Orleans, La.
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