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Clinical Problem Solving
Radiology
October 2014

Mandibular Mass

Author Affiliations
  • 1Division of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
  • 2Division of Plastic, Maxillofacial, and Oral Surgery, Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2014;140(10):985-986. doi:10.1001/jamaoto.2014.1984

An African American woman in her 30s presented after a routine dental radiograph showed a mass in her right mandible that was confirmed on panoramic radiography. She had 1 day of mild soreness of the overlying mucosa. She denied tooth pain, swelling, bleeding, neck lumps, fevers, chills, and weight loss. She had experienced no prior similar episodes. She had no recent dental problems or procedures.

Physical examination revealed no deformity in her facial features and no visible or palpable lesion of her mandible. Teeth 27, 28, 29, 30, and 31 had normal sensation to percussion, palpation, and temperature except for questionable thermal sensitivity of tooth 29. There was no apparent odontogenic disease and no neck masses.

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