Clinical Note
February 2000

Laryngeal Cleft and Eosinophilic GastroenteritisReport of 2 Cases

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Pediatric Otolaryngology (Drs Goldstein and Dohar) and Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology (Dr Putnam), Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, and Departments of Otolaryngology (Drs Goldstein and Dohar) and Pediatrics (Dr Putnam), University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pa. Dr Goldstein is now with the Department of Otolaryngology, State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn. Dr Putnam is now with the Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.


Copyright 2000 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.2000

Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2000;126(2):227-230. doi:10.1001/archotol.126.2.227

Although laryngotracheoesophageal clefts are often found in association with other well-described anomalies, we know of no previous reported association with eosinophilic gastroenteritis, a disorder of unknown etiology characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract. We treated 2 children who had laryngeal clefts and eosinophilic gastroenteritis. Since the esophageal inflammatory changes found in eosinophilic gastroenteritis may persist despite aggressive therapy, management of the laryngotracheoesophageal clefts is more complicated. The diagnosis of eosinophilic gastroenteritis should not be overlooked in patients with laryngotracheoesophageal clefts and warrants prompt referral to a pediatric gastroenterologist.