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Clinical Problem Solving: Radiology
September 2007

Radiology Quiz Case 1: Diagnosis

Author Affiliations
 

PATRICIA A.HUDGINSMD

Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2007;133(9):942-943. doi:10.1001/archotol.133.9.942

Tracheoceles are benign lesions that rarely extend into the cervical region. Addington et al1 reported the first case of a tracheocele in 1944. The lesion's prevalence in a reported autopsy series was approximately 1%.2 It is commonly thought that tracheoceles develop from an inherent weakness in the muscular layer between the transverse bands of the trachealis muscle, which could allow herniation through the tracheal mucosa. The critical pathologic feature is destruction of the elastic tissue. The tracheocele cyst is lined with ciliated columnar epithelium, and the wall consists of fibrous tissue with minor salivary glands but no cartilage or smooth muscle. In our case, the pathologic diagnosis indicated a benign cyst with a respiratory epithelium.

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