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Article
February 1927

INTRANASAL ETHMOIDECTOMYCOURSE AND SEQUELAE ON FRACTURING LAMINA AND INSERTING PACK

Author Affiliations

SYRACUSE, N. Y.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1927;5(2):162-167. doi:10.1001/archotol.1927.00600010174007
Abstract

I do not claim priority for any statements made in this article. I merely call to the attention of physicians my experiences with a procedure that many fear to use. I refer to the fracturing of the lamina papyracea while exenterating the ethmoid labyrinth and the packing of the operative field on the completion of this work.

A brief review of the anatomic relations and the circulatory system of these sinuses will refresh the memory of the reader concerning this structure and will recall the reasons why an ethmoidectomy is often believed to involve danger.

The ethmoid is divided into two plates which cross one antoher—one horizontal and the other vertical. The vertical plate consists of a superior thick portion (the crista galli) and an inferior portion (the perpendicular plate of the ethmoid); the latter forms a part of the bony nasal septum. The horizontal plate is located where

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