[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 1927

PERORAL ENDOSCOPYITS USE IN COMPLICATIONS FOLLOWING OPERATIONS ON THE NOSE AND THROAT

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Chevalier Jackson Bronchoscopic Clinics. Otolaryngology, Colorado Springs, October, 1926.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1927;5(4):321-333. doi:10.1001/archotol.1927.00600010343004
Abstract

Peroral endoscopy, including direct laryngoscopy, bronchoscopy, esophagoscopy and gastroscopy, constitutes a special field in medicine, and requires for its safe and efficient performance special training and the skill that comes from long practice in working through a tube, using only one eye. The otolaryngologist is accustomed to monocular vision, and quickly acquires the ability to interpret correctly the picture seen through the endoscopic tube. He is also familiar with the landmarks of the pharynx and larynx, and is accustomed to operative work and the special technic that is required in the upper air and food passages. The first requisite in the work is an adequate instrumentarium. Small tubes are required for infants and longer tubes for adults. In short, the tube must be adapted to the size of the passage to be examined, and the accessory instrumentarium must be proportionate to the size of the tube. There is no universal

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×