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Article
November 1927

THE USE OF SALT PORK TO CONTROL HEMORRHAGE

Arch Otolaryngol. 1927;6(5):447-449. doi:10.1001/archotol.1927.00610010471007
Abstract

More than ten years ago, Dr. E. L. Keyes, of New York, told me that he had seen a patient with a severe nasal hemorrhage which could not be controlled by the usual gauze packing. The patient stopped the hemorrhage by placing plugs of salt pork in his nostrils. He said that his mother, who also had suffered from severe bleeding from the nose, had taught him to use it.

Larding pork kept in a saturated solution of sodium chloride is practically sterile. Bacterial culture of a piece removed at random from a jar of pork six months old showed only a few colonies of the hay bacillus.

It is hard to say just what the action of the pork is, since several factors are present, namely, pressure, salt, tissue juices and fat.

Pressure has been used from time immemorial to control bleeding, but the pressure from the pork in

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