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Article
December 1927

THE VALUE OF OXYGEN FOLLOWING BRONCHOSCOPY IN CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Division of Medicine and the Section on Clinical Metabolism of the Mayo Clinic.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1927;6(6):542-545. doi:10.1001/archotol.1927.00610010570003
Abstract

Bronchoscopy in children is always a major procedure, especially if a foreign body is to be removed. Two factors that especially add to the danger of such an examination are laryngeal edema and bronchopneumonia. While the skill and care of the operator may reduce this danger, it is always present. Experience teaches that laryngeal edema occurs even when the most skilled operator performs bronchoscopy, and that it cannot be foretold in which cases it will develop. It may occur when the least difficulty has been experienced in introducing the bronchoscope and when the operation has been performed with the greatest dexterity. On the other hand, in cases in which one would be most likely to expect edema because of trauma or difficulty in technic, it may not develop. Bronchopneumonia may occur concomitant with laryngeal edema or independent of it. It usually occurs in cases in which

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