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December 1927

ACUTE FULMINATING OSTEOMYELITIS OF THE FRONTAL SINUSHEMATOGENOUS (?) ORIGIN (DENTAL FOCUS) REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES

Arch Otolaryngol. 1927;6(6):559-564. doi:10.1001/archotol.1927.00610010587006
Abstract

The uncertainty of the etiology, the acute onset, the rapidly developing meningeal symptoms and the rapid improvement and self-limitation prompt me to report this case of acute osteomyelitis of the frontal sinus.

Before reporting the case, I should like to present certain questions that have arisen in the study of osteomyelitis. The reported cases of acute osteomyelitis have usually been those of fulminating diffuse osteomyelitis, originating in the frontal sinuses but gradually spreading without being self-limited. That self-limited frontal osteomyelitis does occur is evident from both surgical and pathologic experience. It has not been explained why it becomes diffuse and fatal in relatively few cases.

The comparison of osteomyelitis of the paranasal sinuses with osteomyelitis of the long bones is interesting because of the striking diversity. In all the reported cases with one exception,1 acute fulminating osteomyelitis of the paranasal sinuses that is diffuse in

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