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Article
January 1929

RIGHT HEMIPLEGIA, APHASIA AND APHONIA FOLLOWING GUNSHOT WOUND OF THE NECK: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

ANN ARBOR, MICH.
From the Department of Neurology, University of Michigan Medical School.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1929;9(1):57-59. doi:10.1001/archotol.1929.00620030065005
Abstract

Cerebral accident secondary to gunshot wounds in the neck are sufficiently rare in civil practice to warrant reporting a case. In military practice, cases are relatively less infrequent. George Makins,1 temporarily surgeon general and consulting surgeon to the British forces, reported fourteen cases and reviewed them critically. Colledge and Dunn2 reported four cases of hemiplegia caused by embolism in the carotid artery following gunshot wound which occurred in military practice; these reports included the autopsy observations.

REPORT OF A CASE

E. F., aged 24, a housewife, was examined eight weeks following a gunshot wound of the neck. She complained of difficulty with speech and in writing the names of some objects, even with the left hand. The injury occurred when an officer shot the patient from a distance of about 200 feet. She immediately became unconscious and was driven to a hospital, a distance of about a

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