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Article
September 1930

DENTIGEROUS CYST OF THE ANTRUM OF HIGHMORE WITH UNUSUAL CHARACTERISTICS

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND
From the Otolaryngological Service of the Department of Surgery, Lakeside Hospital.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1930;12(3):311-319. doi:10.1001/archotol.1930.03570010357004
Abstract

Cysts of dental origin comprise two primary types: (1) the root or periosteal and (2) the follicular or dentigerous. All varieties of these cysts belong to the group of neoplasms known as odontomas and seem to result from a perverted growth of cells in a tooth follicle. The stimulus which is directly responsible for the growth may be congenital or acquired.

Brief consideration of the embryology of a tooth follicle may throw light on the pathogenesis of these tumors. In the development of a tooth the deeper layer of oral epithelium grows into the mesodermal area of the rudimentary jaw, the projection forming the epithelial cord. Penetrating more deeply into the jaw, the latter divides and becomes the primitive organ which forms, in turn, the enamel tissue. The papilla, a product of the contiguous connective tissue, develops simultaneously with, and invaginates, the enamel organ. These become encircled by a dental

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