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Article
November 1934

ROENTGEN CHANGES IN THE PETROUS PORTION OF THE TEMPORAL BONE WITHOUT CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the department of otology, School of Medicine, Temple University, and of the Graduate School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1934;20(5):615-648. doi:10.1001/archotol.1934.03600050002001
Abstract

Since Gradenigo first described his classic triad, numerous authors have endeavored to offer explanations for this condition. Careful histologic study has added much to the knowledge of disturbances of the temporal bone.

It is known that at least 80 per cent of the patients with Gradenigo's syndrome recover following simple mastoidectomy. In the 20 per cent who succumb, histopathologic study reveals that suppuration of the apex of the petrous portion of the temporal bone is more frequent than has been suspected.

It has been argued by many that Gradenigo's syndrome is not a distinct clinical entity, owing to the lack of adequate anatomic and pathologic bases. Numerous attempts have been made to show that palsy of the sixth nerve is due to involvement in Dorello's canal (Vail1 and others), to venous congestion (Freisner and Druss,2 Ruskin,3 and others) or to localized meningeal irritation (Eagleton4).

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