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December 1934

SEQUELAE OF SCARLET FEVERINVOLVING TEMPORAL BONES, PARANASAL SINUSES, MENINGES, AND LATERAL AND CAVERNOUS SINUSES, WITH NEW BONE FORMATION IN JUGULAR BULB

Arch Otolaryngol. 1934;20(6):849-860. doi:10.1001/archotol.1934.03600060086009
Abstract

The case reported here is recorded because it presented symptoms of every intracranial involvement known to complicate infection of the ear, nose and throat. The pathologic study of the temporal bones and of a block from the sphenoid bone revealed: thrombosis of the lateral and cavernous sinuses; abscess of the carotid artery; labyrinthitis; petrositis, with extension to the meninges, and organization, with new bone formation blocking the jugular bulb.

REPORT OF A CASE  H. C., aged 6 years, entered the St. Louis Children's Hospital five days after the onset of an acute infection of the ears, nose and throat complicating scarlet fever. He had had earache, severe sore throat and vomiting, with high fever at the onset. The past history was irrelevant, except for mumps at 4 years of age and frequent colds in the head. Physical examination revealed a stuporous, poorly nourished child with marked acidosis and anhydremia. The

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