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Article
May 1938

STUDIES IN THE MECHANISM OF THE ACTION OF SULFANILAMIDEII. SULFANILAMIDE IN THE TREATMENT OF EXPERIMENTAL STREPTOCOCCIC MENINGITIS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Laboratory of Surgical Bacteriology, Harrison Department of Surgical Research, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1938;27(5):535-551. doi:10.1001/archotol.1938.00650030548002
Abstract

Since the introduction of sulfanilamide (paraaminobenzenesulfonamide), many reports1 have appeared concerning the successful treatment of meningitis due to Streptococcus haemolyticus in man. This is of considerable importance, since the mortality rate for all types of streptococcic meningitis has been estimated by Gray2 at 97 per cent with means of treatment other than sulfanilamide. Any therapy that gives promise of materially lowering this mortality rate is indeed welcome, even if it is accompanied by minor untoward effects, such as those indicated by recent reports on toxic manifestations due to sulfanilamide.3

A review of the literature reveals that in most of the animal experiments in which sulfanilamide was used to treat infection due to Str. haemolyticus, the infection was confined to tissues other than the meninges;4 i. e., subcutaneous infection, intraperitoneal infection or septicemia was treated. We are not aware of any reports of experiments in which sulfanilamide was used to treat

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