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Article
December 1939

CONGENITAL CYSTS OF THE LARYNXREPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Section on Laryngology, Oral and Plastic Surgery, the Mayo Clinic.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1939;30(6):943-949. doi:10.1001/archotol.1939.00650061022007
Abstract

Congenital or embryonic cysts of the larynx are of interest to the laryngologist primarily because of their extreme rarity. In fact, any type of cyst is seen rather infrequently in this region. Of 722 cases of benign laryngeal tumors encountered at the Mayo Clinic prior to 1938, only 35 were cases of cysts, and in but 1 was the cyst of embryonic origin. This case was reported previously.1 Since then we have encountered 2 other cases of congenital cysts of the larynx, of which we wish to mention 1 and to report the other at this time.

Cysts of the larynx are of three types, namely, mucous, hemorrhagic and congenital. Most common are the mucous cysts; their etiology undoubtedly points to an inflammatory basis which results in an obstruction of the ductal portion of a mucous gland. Because of this atresia, the mucus is unable to escape and accumulates within

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