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Article
January 1940

THE VOICE AFTER DIRECT LARYNGOSCOPIC OPERATIONS, LARYNGOFISSURE AND LARYNGECTOMY

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From Temple University Hospital.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1940;31(1):23-37. doi:10.1001/archotol.1940.00660010024004
Abstract

Voice is the chief consideration in the treatment of most benign laryngeal conditions. In malignant conditions voice must obviously be relegated to second place, because the first and most urgent indication is to cure the cancer. It is necessary to explain this to the patient and his family, so that they may readjust their attitude and accept whatever vocal impairment may be entailed in the procedure required to obtain the proper prospect of cure. However, the fact remains that one of the things that the patient is most anxious to know before consenting to the necessary operation is whether he will lose his voice. Many people believe that removal of the vocal cords will make it impossible for them to talk, and the majority of those to whom total laryngectomy is advised are skeptical when assured that they will soon learn a new way of talking after the larynx is

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