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Article
August 1941

SIGNIFICANCE OF THE pH OF NASAL SECRETIONS IN SITUFURTHER STUDIES

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Laryngology, Rhinology and Otology and the Department of Pathology, University of Illinois College of Medicine.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1941;34(2):297-301. doi:10.1001/archotol.1941.00660040323006
Abstract

In a previous communication I1 maintained that nasal vasoconstrictors with an unusually high pH value may (1) disturb the normal pH level of nasal secretions in situ in the clinically normal nose, (2) enhance irritation of the nasal mucous membrane and (3) postpone the return of the nasal mucosa from a pathologic alkaline status to a normal, slightly acid status. It has been suggested that during acute rhinitis, acute rhinosinusitis and the more active stages of allergic rhinitis the employment of a nasal vasoconstrictor which lowers the alkaline pH to a normal acid level, between 5.5 and 6.5, is most desirable. The fact that 1 per cent ephedrine hydrochloride in physiologic solution of sodium chloride—a nasal vasoconstrictor almost universally acceptable to rhinologists—has a pH (5.9) that practically cleaves the midpoint between 5.5 and 6.5 furnishes adequate testimony to the truth of this concept.

It has been suggested further that there

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