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Article
August 1941

EFFECT OF SILVER PREPARATIONS AND ANTISEPTICS ON THE pH OF NASAL SECRETIONS IN SITU

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Laryngology, Rhinology and Otology and the Department of Pathology, University of Illinois College of Medicine.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1941;34(2):302-306. doi:10.1001/archotol.1941.00660040328007
Abstract

I have suggested1 that every nasal vasoconstrictor prescribed by physicians and sold to the public should satisfy two basic physiologic requirements: (1) It should restore and maintain normal ciliary activity and (2) it should be slightly acid, with a pH value in the normal pH range of nasal secretions in situ, i. e., between 5.5 and 6.5. To emphasize the ciliary factor apart from the pH factor is to tell but half the story of applied nasal physiology.

I have demonstrated the significance of the pH factor by showing that each of the well recommended therapeutic measures employed in the treatment of acute rhinitis and acute rhinosinusitis—namely, the careful selection and administration of an appropriate nasal vasoconstrictor, the assurance of sufficient rest and adequate sleep and the judicious administration of external heat—produces uniformly a single nasal pH phenomenon, acidity. Further, I have maintained that anynasal surgical procedure which is performed

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