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Article
September 1941

REVERSAL OF HALISTERESIS IN THE MAMMALIAN EAR

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES
From the Department of Otolaryngology, University of Southern California.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1941;34(3):501-522. doi:10.1001/archotol.1941.00660040541007
Abstract

In otosclerosis one deals with an osseous dystrophy of the aural capsule and in many cases with a neuropathy of the eighth nerve. Until recently the neural degenerative changes (fig. 1 A) were not considered an essential part of the pathologic picture of progressive hereditary deafness but were regarded rather as a complication due to other factors.

Surrounding the focus of otosclerotic bone is usually an area of decalcification, or halisteresis (fig. 1B). This area of "preparedness" finally becomes, through complete bone resorption (fig. 2 A and B), a cavity filled with osteogenetic marrow, derived from the focus of dystrophy. In this marrow, new abnormal bone forms, thus increasing the size of the original focus.1

A series of patients with classic otosclerosis have been treated with dietary regulation and administration of dicalcium phosphate (CaHPO4), vitamins, insulin, extract of liver and other preparations and observed over a period of four years.

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