[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 1942

INTRACRANIAL COMPLICATIONS OF TONSILLAR ORIGINWITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THEIR INCIDENCE AND PATHOGENESIS

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES
From the Departments of Otolaryngology and Neurology, College of Medical Evangelists, and the Cajal Laboratory of Neuropathology, Los Angeles County Hospital.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1942;35(4):530-571. doi:10.1001/archotol.1942.00670010535003
Abstract

Of all the regional areas in the field of otolaryngology, the tonsils are second only to the larynx and esophagus in the rarity with which infections extend into the intracranial space. Nevertheless, such complications do occur and present considerable variation in the routes by which infection reaches the intracranial space and the nature and extent of the intracranial lesion. It is the object of this contribution to review the literature concerned with the problem, to study the pathogenesis and nature of the consequent lesions and to report 2 cases which have come to our attention.

INCIDENCE  In a survey of a series of 25,000 autopsies performed in the Los Angeles General Hospital one of us (Dr. Courville) found only 1 instance of intracranial complication of tonsillar origin, the report of which appears in this paper. In a series of 10,000 cases of tonsillectomy, Leatherwood1 cited the case of a child

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×