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Article
November 1942

EFFECTS OF VARIOUS TYPES OF MOTION ON DIFFERENCES IN HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE BETWEEN ENDS OF A SEMICIRCULAR CANALA THEORETIC ANALYSIS

Author Affiliations

COLLEGE PARK, MD.; WESTMINSTER, MD.; PHILADELPHIA
From the physics departments of the University of Maryland and Western Maryland College, and the Lankenau Hospital Research Institute.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1942;36(5):691-703. doi:10.1001/archotol.1942.03760050083008
Abstract

In this paper a semicircular canal has been idealized, by making the following assumptions: (1) There is no flow of endolymph in the canal. (2) Response to motion is due to the pressure changes produced at the ends of the canal. (3) The walls of the canal are rigid. (4) The endolymph is incompressible and fills the entire canal. The mathematical analysis for every possible type of motion shows that pressure differences between the ends of the canal are produced only by linear acceleration or by angular acceleration or velocity about axes oriented in specific ways in respect to the canal. The pressure differences thus arising in the canal may be presumed to be a source of nerve stimuli. Substitution of experimental results in the derived equations should provide a test of the practical validity of the assumptions. Thus evidence can be obtained to determine whether or not there is

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