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Article
February 1945

DIABETIC GANGRENE INVOLVING THE SINUSES

Author Affiliations

PASADENA, CALIF.
From the Department of Otolaryngology, University of Southern California School of Medicine, service of J. McKenzie Brown, M.D.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1945;41(2):143-146. doi:10.1001/archotol.1945.00680030168008
Abstract

Diabetic gangrene of the nose is rare enough to be reported as a medical curiosity. A search of the literature showed only 15 cases of diabetes involving the head. Eight cases of diabetes involving the nose or the sinuses were recorded; 1, the tongue; 2, the eyes; 6, chiefly the face, and 1, an area about the ear. Three new cases are reported in this article.

Trautmann1 reported in 1910 the case of a man of 52 with diabetes in whom necrosis of the septum developed and who "sneezed out a piece of cartilage the size of a 5 pfennig piece."

Bowers2 in 1924 reported a remarkable series of 3 cases in which the patients were all children under 11 years of age. The first 2 patients were seen before insulin was discovered, and both died. The third recovered with insulin. The first patient was aged 4½. There was gangrene

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