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Article
October 1945

DEVELOPMENT OF THE COCHLEAR AQUEDUCT AND THE ROUND WINDOW MEMBRANE IN THE HUMAN EMBRYO

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Otolaryngology of the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and the Presbyterian Hospital.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1945;42(4):239-252. doi:10.1001/archotol.1945.00680040323002
Abstract

The physiologic importance of the cochlear aqueduct and the question of its patency still belong to the moot chapters of otology. Streeter1 described the aqueduct in 85 and 130 mm. fetuses as a tubular pouch projecting from the subarachnoid spaces along the glossopharyngeal nerve toward the scala tympani and came to the conclusion that the communication had to be established soon after this stage. Karlefors2 identified the first anlage of the aqueduct in a 53.3 and 65 mm. embryo as a more or less dense connective tissue which connected the scala tympani with the glossopharyngeal nerve. Later the connective tissue becomes loose to the extent that a lumen is formed in that portion of the aqueduct which is close to the posterior cerebral fossa. The connective tissue of the aqueduct continues with the lining of the scala tympani on one side and with the dura and the arachnoidea or the

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