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Article
May 1946

ADVANCES IN THE UNDERSTANDING OF RHINOLOGIC AND OTOLOGIC CONDITIONS RELATED TO THE NERVOUS SYSTEMA Critical Survey of Recent Literature

Author Affiliations

NEWARK, N. J.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1946;43(5):511-541. doi:10.1001/archotol.1946.00680050529007
Abstract

TINNITUS AND DEAFNESS IN CENTRAL LESIONS OF THE BRAIN  Deafness from Lesions of the Pons.Anatomy of the Pons.—From a diagnostic standpoint the pons may be divided dorsoventrally into three portions:

  1. The tegmentum,92 lying in the center. It is the dorsal part of the pedunculus cerebri (the crus cerebri). It is also called area tegmentatis Forel—the diencephalomesencephalic junction. The tegmentum is associated with primitive kinetic and static mechanisms.

  2. The basis, situated ventrally. The syndrome of disease of the pontile basis is predominantly motor, since the pyramidal tracts are located ventrally in the basis.

  3. The tectum, situated dosally. It is the tectum mesencephali, the corpus quadrigeminum, which forms the roof of the midbrain. The superior colliculus93 makes up the rostral part of the tectum (Krieg94).

Lesions of the Pontile Tegmentum.—A lesion limited to the central portion of the tegmentum on one side results in myoclonus of the palate, the corner of the

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