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Article
February 1949

UNUSUAL OTITIC FOREIGN BODIESReport of Two Cases

Author Affiliations

ATLANTA, GA.
From the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Emory University School of Medicine.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1949;49(2):196-200. doi:10.1001/archotol.1949.03760080074006
Abstract

A REVIEW of the literature in English since 1920 reveals reports of several unusual and interesting cases of a foreign body in the ear. Historically, each is an individual case, but all were the results of accidents. The purposes of this paper are: (1) to record 2 additional cases which are similar both in nature and in subsequent diagnosis and treatment, and (2) to indicate a procedure for reducing the recurrence of otitic disturbances in such cases. Necessity for examination with instruments is emphasized.

HISTORICAL REVIEW  Whale1 reported an interesting otitic injury incurred by a soldier during World War I. A piece of shrapnel had been driven through both maxillary sinuses, the nasal cavity and the right orbit, with resulting destruction of the eye, and into the petrous bone. The soldier underwent several operations for plastic repair of the face and was considered cured. Approximately five years later he

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