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Article
October 1949

ABSCESS OF THE BRAIN FOLLOWING TONSILLECTOMY AND ADENOIDECTOMY

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1949;50(4):450-452. doi:10.1001/archotol.1949.00700010462009
Abstract

INTRACRANIAL complications of infection of the tonsils and adenoids have been fully discussed by Hara and Courville.1 In their survey of the literature from 1900 to 1940, they recorded the incidence of intracranial complications of tonsillar origin as follows:

In only 7 of these cases did the complication follow operation on the tonsils and adenoids; in the majority it resulted from tonsillitis or peritonsillar abscess. The rarity of cerebral complications of operations on the tonsils and adenoids is evident from other statistical data cited by Hara and Courville. In 25,000 autopsy records in the Los Angeles General Hospital only 1 instance of intracranial disease of tonsillar origin was found.

Letherwood,2 in a series of 10,000 cases of tonsillectomy, cited 1 case, that of purulent meningitis developing in a child. Chisolm and Watkins3 found 8 cases of thrombosis of the cavernous sinus among 50,000 surgical records, but in

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