[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 1950

STRICTURE OF THE ESOPHAGUS ASSOCIATED WITH OPERATION FOR DUODENAL ULCER

Author Affiliations

MILWAUKEE
From the Departments of Otolaryngology, Marquette University School of Medicine and Veterans Hospital, Wood, Wis.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1950;51(2):165-171. doi:10.1001/archotol.1950.00700020186002
Abstract

THE ROLE of abdominal infection in the production of benign esophageal stricture has long been a topic of discussion. Mosher stated the belief that fibrosis of the esophagus can develop from an infectious thrombophlebitis of the esophageal and periesophageal veins originating from infections of the liver and the gallbladder. Benign strictures of the esophagus associated with duodenal ulcer have been reported by various authors.

Larson, Layne and Howard1 reported such a case. Their patient had a typical history of duodenal ulcer and roentgen evidence of ulcer. A posterior gastroenterostomy was performed. At the end of the fourth postoperative week dysphagia began to be apparent. Roentgen examination showed an almost complete obstruction in the lowest third of the esophagus, about 2 inches (5 cm.) above the diaphragm. Attempts were made to dilate the stricture. A massive pleural effusion containing large numbers of hemolytic streptococci suddenly developed and the patient died. Postmortem

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×