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Article
November 1950

ABSCESS OF THE NASAL SEPTUM AND ORBITAL CELLULITIS IN AN INFANT

Author Affiliations

Resident in Otolaryngology and Rhinology, Medical College of Virginia; Resident in Ophthalmology, Medical College of Virginia RICHMOND, VA.
From the Department of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology and the Department of Ophthalmology, Medical College of Virginia.

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1950;52(5):773-775. doi:10.1001/archotol.1950.00700030799006
Abstract

Abscess of the nasal septum is sometimes noted following trauma, infection and other diseases of the nasal structures. Though not common, it is readily recognized and satisfactorily treated when uncomplicated. Before the present era of antibiotics the more serious complications, meningitis and septicemia, sometimes resulted in death. In infants septal abscess is a rare condition, whether it occurs with or without complications.

REPORT OF A CASE  G. L., a Negro male infant 25 days of age, was admitted to Dooley Hospital of the Medical College of Virginia on Aug. 25, 1949. The following history was elicited. At birth, a midwife had assisted, and his condition was considered normal by her. When the patient was 17 days old the family physician was called for him and nose drops were prescribed for a "head cold" and nasal discharge. Two days later swelling of the left eye was noted. Six daily injections (dosage

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