[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 1950

RECRUITMENT PHENOMENON IN CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMAReport of Representative Cases

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Department of Otorhinology, Temple University School of Medicine, and the Mount Sinai Hospital.

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1950;52(5):782-785. doi:10.1001/archotol.1950.00700030808009
Abstract

The theory of loudness recruitment has been formulated by Fowler.1 Clinically, this phenomenon is utilized to distinguish between a conduction impairment and a nerve defect. In the words of Fowler, "The recruitment of loudness with intensity enables one to diagnose obstruction from nerve deafness." By means of the loudness balance test, it has become possible to make a quantitative determination of the degree of recoupment. The results vary. Most patients with "nerve" deafness of undetermined origin show considerable recruitment to sounds of the higher frequency range; some patients possess this factor to a minimal extent; a few are devoid of it altogether. In acoustic trauma, the 4096 wedge is usually devoid of this phenomenon. The individual with a high tone impairment frequently possesses this factor to a remarkable degree. In a series of 20 patients with degeneration of the acoustic nerve, studied by Dix, Hallpike and Hood,2 slight loudness recruitment

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×