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Article
November 1953

ACUTE IODISM FOLLOWING USE OF CHLORIODIZED OIL (IODOCHLOROL) IN BRONCHOGRAPHYReport of a Case

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES
From the Medical Service, Veterans Administration Center, General Medical and Surgical Hospital.

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1953;58(5):536-539. doi:10.1001/archotol.1953.00710040562002
Abstract

THE FOLLOWING case of acute iodism and bronchopneumonia subsequent to bronchography with chloriodized oil (Iodochlorol), a chlorinated iodized peanut oil, is presented as the first of its kind recorded in the literature. An iodized poppyseed oil (Lipiodol [Lafay] ) has been used as a diagnostic agent in bronchography since 1922, when it was introduced by Sicard and Forestier.1 Undesirable reactions, while uncommon, have been reported as a result of the use of this agent. These reactions may be divided into two classes. The first class constitutes several local phenomena resulting from the tissue response provoked by the instillation of the contrast substance. Bronchial asthma, local atelectasis, and massive collapse of the lung have been cited as occurring during bronchography or shortly after its completion.2 Focal lipid granulomatosis arising two to four weeks after bronchography has been described by several investigators.3 Microscopic examination, as well as experimentally induced lesions,

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