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Article
March 1954

GENESIS OF NASAL PERFORATION IN LEPROMATOUS LEPROSYIts Prevention and Care

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1954;59(3):306-311. doi:10.1001/archotol.1954.00710050318005
Abstract

TEXTBOOKS of medical diagnosis commonly list syphilis, tuberculosis, and lupus erythematosus as the chronic diseases producing septal perforations. Each is purported to have a site of predilection for attack which is of diagnostic value; all are relatively rare. To this triumvirate should be added a commoner fourth, also having a site of predilection which gives it diagnostic value, lepromatous leprosy.1

By way of general review, the skeleton of the nasal septum in the human is composed of several component parts. Anteriorly are found the two medial crura of the alae, forming the columella. This is separated from the cartilaginous quadrangular plate of the septum by a short stretch of skin and subcutaneous tissue. The quadrangular plate sits on the palatine crest, which begins at the nasal spine and ends in the palatine division of the palate posteriorly. Superiorly, this plate acts as the support to the nonosseous portion of

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