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Article
June 1967

Hemangioma of the MandibleDiagnosis and Therapy

Author Affiliations

New York
From the Department of Radiology, Cornell Medical College and New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, New York.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1967;85(6):648-652. doi:10.1001/archotol.1967.00760040650011
Abstract

HEMANGIOMA of bone is a benign, usually slow-growing neoplasm, arising from vascular tissue, of varying size, and seen in almost any location in the skeleton. It exists with varying degrees of rarity, depending on site, and has potential for grave clinical significance, depending again on relative anatomical geography. Hemangiomas involving bone present a different and perhaps even more challenging problem in therapy than do the hemangiomas found in soft tissues, even though both groups are histostructurally similar. Spontaneous regression is by far the most usual order of outcome in the soft-tissue lesion, particularly the cavernous variety. Lampe and Latourette1 treated a large group of soft tissue cavernous hemangiomas with x-radiation and compared them with a control of similar size. The results, in final evaluation, were no different.

Our fortunes have not been quite so good in our encounter with hemangioma of bone. Because of their potential clinical gravity and

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