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Article
October 1975

The Contralateral Ear in Ménière DiseaseA Survey of 292 Patients

Author Affiliations

From the Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic, Vestibular Department, University of Amsterdam, Wilhelmina Gasthuis, Amsterdam.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1975;101(10):608-612. doi:10.1001/archotol.1975.00780390022006
Abstract

• We conducted a survey of 292 patients who had Ménière disease to determine whether there was either some subjective complaint like tinnitus or hearing impairment or an objective symptom like hearing loss or recruitment of the contralateral ear.

In 212 (73%) patients, signs of disturbed hearing in the second ear were present. If only the combination of sensorineural hearing loss, recruitment, and tinnitus is accepted as a definite proof of the diagnosis of Ménière disease, at least 10% of the patients we studied suffer from bilateral Ménière disease.

Usually, there is an interval between the onset of the impairment in the first and in the second ear; an involvement of both ears from the first onset of the disease has been found in only six patients. We believe that involvement of the second ear in so many of the patients suggests that a conservative method of treatment should always be considered.

(Arch Otolaryngol 101:608-612, 1975)

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