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Clinical Problem Solving: Radiology
August 2004

Radiology Quiz Case 2—Diagnosis

Author Affiliations
 

R. NICKBRYANMDPATRICIA A.HUDGINSMD

Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2004;130(8):999. doi:10.1001/archotol.130.8.999

Neoplasms arising from the parapharyngeal space represent 0.5% of all tumors of the head and neck. Of these, approximately 50% are of salivary gland origin, 30% are neurogenic neoplasms, and 5% are malignant lymphomas; the rest are sarcomas and other unusual tumors.1 Approximately 13% of lipomas arise in the head and neck region. Most of them occur subcutaneously in the posterior aspect of the neck. Lipomas rarely develop in the anterior aspect of the neck or in the oral cavity, parotid glands, hypopharynx, larynx, or nasopharynx; they occasionally occur intracranially as well as in the parapharyngeal space. They may be single or multiple and superficial or deep.2

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