[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.159.202.12. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Views 272
Citations 0
Editorial
May 2012

Public Policy to Improve Child Nutrition and HealthChallenges and Opportunities

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Department of Epidemiology and Statistics, School of Public Health, University at Albany, State University of New York, and Health Policy and Research Translation Unit, Division of Chronic Disease Prevention, New York State Department of Health, Albany.

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(5):485-487. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.196

You are what you eat. An old adage that recognizes the critical role that diet has on health. With the goal of improving the nutrition and health of targeted populations, federal, state, and local governments have developed and implemented public health policies and programs to prevent nutritional deficiencies by providing nutritious foods, fortifying foods or beverages, and, more recently, limiting the calorie, fat, or sugar content of high-calorie, low-nutrient foods. Two articles1,2 in this issue of the Archives contribute to the growing evidence base that public health nutrition policies can favorably impact children's diets and their health.

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×