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August 1918

VARIATIONS IN THE LIPOID ("FAT") CONTENT OF THE BLOOD OF INFANTS UNDER CERTAIN NUTRITIONAL CONDITIONS

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS BOSTON
From the Boston Floating Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1918;16(2):75-82. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1918.01910140014002
Abstract

Clinical experience has shown that without a certain amount of fat in the food of an infant, normal growth is not be be expected. Excessively high fat feeding, on the other hand, may overtax the assimilative functions of the body and lead to most serious consequences. Thus intestinal indigestion with diarrhea and a lowering of the tolerance for all food is, at times, the result of an excessive amount of fat. Failure to gain weight, constipation, the conditions variously described as "Chronic Fat Indigestion," "Milchnährschaden," "Bilanzstörung," have all been attributed to relative or absolute excess of fat in the diet.

The infant fed on considerable amounts of fat, but unable to utilize this fat, is virtually in a state of fat starvation. Analyses of the stools for fat or its derivatives gives us some information as to the efficiency with which fat of the food is digested and absorbed. Further

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