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February 1920

RECENT WORK IN ANATOMY, PHYSIOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY OF INFANCY AND CHILDHOOD

Am J Dis Child. 1920;19(2):148-166. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1920.01910200064009
Abstract

ANATOMY  Significance of Striations in Muscle.—Lewis,1 in some studies on the cells of heart muscle from very young chick embryos, arrives at some conclusions that are of far reaching application. She finds it possible to study with satisfaction the living cells of heart muscle from embryos of ten myotomes. In these cells she finds that complete cross striations are present, and much earlier than has been supposed by other observers. Cross striations are present, but not fibrils. The cross striations are very thin bands on the surface of the cell. They extend across the cell and never appear as narrow threads or fibrils. Fixation of the cell causes the formation of the surface layer into fibrils on which the cross striations are drawn together into deeper bundles, and then become evident as sharply marked structures. In places where the pull on the surfaces of the cell is such

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