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May 1920

THE ANTINEURITIC AND GROWTH STIMULATING PROPERTIES OF ORANGE JUICE

Author Affiliations

IOWA CITY
From the Department of Pediatrics and the Child Welfare Research Station, State University of Iowa.

Am J Dis Child. 1920;19(5):349-358. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1920.01910230019004
Abstract

Orange juice has been so universally regarded as an antiscorbutic, that its other possible properties as affecting the well-being of artificially fed infants have not received much consideration. This, perhaps, is to be expected in view of the fact that the daily giving of orange juice is comparatively recent.1 Orange juice has been widely used as a mild cathartic for infants and young children, its potency having been assumed. Recently, Gerstenberger2 has pointed out that there is no experimental basis for this, and states that, on the contrary, orange juice tends to constipate. The diuretic property of orange juice has been noted by Gerstenberger,3 and again by Hess.4 Orange juice was the chief constituent of a fruit mixture used by Gladstone5 in treating certain cases of marasmus. This mixture, of which he used a surprisingly large amount—24 ounces a day—consisted of 2 parts of orange

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