[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
June 1920

FORDYCE'S DISEASE AS PSEUDOKOPLIK SPOTS AND A CAUSE OF MISTAKES IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF MEASLES

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN
From the Kingston Avenue Hospital of the Bureau of Hospitals, Department of Health of New York City, Dr. R. J. Wilson, Director.

Am J Dis Child. 1920;19(6):455-458. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1920.01910240043004
Abstract

Fordyce's disease is a chronic disease of the mucous membrane of the mouth and lips which is characterized by the presence "of whitish or yellowish, scanty or abundant, discrete, aggravated and often coalescent miliumlike bodies, occuring more especially on the inside of the mouth, laterally along the line of the teeth as far back as the last molar, and possibly somewhat less frequently on the vermilion or mucus and inner surface of the lips."1 The lesions are from pinpoint to pinhead in size, and usually of a pale buff or oatmeal color. They are almost invariably imperceptible to touch, being situated on a level with the buccal mucosa, but at times they may send out hairylike projections which penetrate the mucous membrane. As a rule, the patient is unconscious of the condition, as subjective symptoms are lacking. The disease is most commonly encountered between the ages of 20 and

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×