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July 1920

THE HEMORRHAGIC TENDENCY AS A FREQUENT CAUSE OF CRANIAL HEMORRHAGE OF THE NEW-BORN

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.
From the Pediatric Department of Georgetown University and the Obstetrical Wards of Providence Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1920;20(1):18-21. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1920.01910250026003
Abstract

At the meeting of the Section on Diseases of Children of the American Medical Association in Chicago, June, 1918, I expressed the belief that an important factor in intracranial hemorrhage occurring during, or soon after birth, was the so-called hemorrhagic tendency of the new-born, frequently expressed in hemorrhages from the mucous surfaces in various portions of the body.1 A case in point was cited of an infant, 3 days old, in which, following diagnosis, a cranial decompression was performed, revealing a general hemorrhagic oozing of the pia. Convulsions and other cranial pressure symptoms were relieved, but vomiting of blood, and hemorrhage from the rectum, caused death a day later, in spite of prompt blood transfusion from the father. The free use of lumbar puncture and of human blood serum, horse serum or thromboplastin was suggested at that time in every instance where intracranial hemorrhage of the new-born is suspected.

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