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August 1920

CASE OF PURPURA WITH SYMMETRICAL GANGRENE OF THE FINGERS

Am J Dis Child. 1920;20(2):124-126. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1920.01910260050007
Abstract

Baby Max, 2½ years old, entered Mary Thompson Hospital, June 17, 1918.

History of Illness.—Jan. 22, 1918, the child was taken ill with fever, restlessness and swelling of the glands of the neck. There was a slight sore throat and cough. During the first week of the attack large purpuric patches appeared over both upper and lower extremities. The temperature ranged between 103 and 104 F. This condition lasted about four weeks, when the purpura began to fade and the fever to subside. After an intermission of two weeks, during which the child seemed fairly well, the temperature rose again and new purpuric patches appeared, this time covering the trunk and the extremities. The second attack lasted about six weeks, the temperature ranging between 101 and 103 F. Then after a second remission for two weeks the first phalanges of all the fingers of the right hand and of

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