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September 1920

THE CIRCULATORY REACTIONS TO GRADUATED EXERCISE IN NORMAL CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the New York Nursery and Child's Hospital, and the Department of Pediatrics, Cornell University Medical College, New York.

Am J Dis Child. 1920;20(3):188-198. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1920.01910270036003
Abstract

INTRODUCTION  Recent experience at the army camps has demonstrated the importance of physical training in the adult. We know that exercise is necessary for normal children, since it is indispensable for proper development of the skeletal muscles, the heart and lungs; and latterly the medical profession has come to appreciate that exercise is also important for children with chronic valvular disease. It is very difficult to decide on the amount of exercise to be allowed a patient with cardiac disease. The subjective symptoms and objective findings following given exercise have been depended on to determine the "exercise tolerance." Individual interpretation of clinical symptoms in children is naturally limited and variable, and here it also must be remembered that there is a certain element of error in a child's estimate of its subjective sensations following exercise. For these reasons, any additional facts in estimating the "exercise tolerance" would be of great

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