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February 1921

DEVIATION OF THE AORTIC SEPTUM: COMPLETE TRANSPOSITION OF THE GREAT VESSELS, WITH REPORT OF TWO CASES IN INFANTS

Author Affiliations

Resident Pathologist of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital BOSTON

Am J Dis Child. 1921;21(2):176-182. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1921.01910320073009
Abstract

Congenital cardiac abnormalities are encountered sufficiently often to emphasize the manifold possibilities of such defective development, their frequent multiplicity of expression in a single case, and the difficulties in the way of recognizing antemortem the actual lesions present. Such signs as cyanosis since birth, a loud murmur and thrill at the base of the heart, and clubbed fingers—when taken together are quite pathognomonic of congenital heart disease. But defects of the organ acquired in utero are seldom single, and the mechanical explanation of the physical findings is often a difficult problem.

Complete transposition of the great vessels is uncommon enough to warrant publication of such cases as are proved at necropsy. I have found two instances of this condition in infants, one living three weeks and the other twelve months, the duration of life and the relation of the heart lesions thereto furnishing an instructive feature. The cases are from

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