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September 1921

A BACTERIOLOGICAL STUDY OF THE FECAL FLORA OF INFANTS AND CHILDREN (THE LACK OF ASSOCIATION OF NUTRITIONAL DISORDERS WITH A SO-CALLED "PUTREFACTIVE" INTESTINAL FLORA)

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE
From the Harriet Lane Home, Johns Hopkins Hospital and the Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University.

Am J Dis Child. 1921;22(3):284-298. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1921.04120030063006
Abstract

INTRODUCTION  James Jackson1 of Boston, in 1812, attributed "the chemical changes which take place in the contents of the stomach and bowels of children dying of diarrhea to the putrefaction of animal food and the acetous fermentation of that which is vegetable." Since then there have been numerous attempts, at first philosophic and later bacteriologic, to establish a relationship between putrefactive and fermentative stools and certain clinical symptoms. The recent work of Porter, Morris and Meyer,2 deserves attention. They have suggested that it is possible to differentiate between "putrefactive," "fermentative" and "normal" stools by the bacteriologic action of feces on various types of culture mediums. The statement is made that a strongly "putrefactive" flora is associated with certain groups of intestinal disorders of infancy, and that clinical and bacteriologic improvement is frequently accomplished in these patients by a strict carbohydrate diet. If these conclusions are justified, a distinct

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