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February 1922

EFFECT OF TONSILLECTOMY ON NUTRITION IN TWELVE HUNDRED CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, N. Y.
From the Nose and Throat Department of the Rochester Dental Dispensary.

Am J Dis Child. 1922;23(2):139-141. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1922.01910380050005
Abstract

Tonsillectomy has become a common operation. The indications for this procedure differ. Until recently tonsils were removed only if they were obstructive or presented definite evidence of infection. Marked improvement followed the removal of such tonsils in most instances. In recent years the operation has been recommended as a prophylactic procedure, and so-called potentially diseased tonsils are removed. Much is expected from a tonsillectomy and I believe rightly so if the tonsils are at fault. One is so often impressed with the marked improvement in nutrition after such an operation that the influence of the operation on nutrition cannot be overlooked.

In a clinic in which ten thousand children were subjected to the operation, a study was made of twelve hundred to determine the effect of the operation on nutrition. These children received more or less uniform care having all been operated on in one clinic by the same surgeons

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