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November 1922

THE INCIDENCE OF MENINGITIS IN EARLY INFANCY, WITH A DESCRIPTION OF TWO CASES DUE TO UNUSUAL ORGANISMS

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS
From the Departments of Pediatrics and Pathology, Washington University School of Medicine, and the St. Louis Children's Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1922;24(5):387-396. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1922.04120110028004
Abstract

Although meningitis is common in childhood, it is rather infrequent in early infancy and relatively few instances have been described in infants under 3 months of age. This may be due, in part, to the relative isolation of young infants and the consequent lack of opportunity for infection. A variety of micro-organisms has been associated with meningeal infections, and it is of interest that certain of them have been particularly associated with meningitis in early infancy while infection with other types of organisms has been relatively rare. It is also noteworthy that certain types of bacteria which not infrequently cause meningitis in early infancy are rarely associated with such infections later in life. In this paper are reported two instances of meningitis in young infants caused by organisms of this latter type. In addition we have observed four cases of meningococcus meningitis (cerebrospinal fever), two others due to the streptococcus

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