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December 1922

THE TREATMENT OF ACCESSORY NASAL SINUS DISEASE IN CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

OMAHA
From the Department of Otology University of Nebraska Medical Department.

Am J Dis Child. 1922;24(6):520-525. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1922.04120120071004
Abstract

The accessory nasal sinuses in children vary in their relative size and development. Schaeffer's1 measurements in a series of cases show that the antrum is by far the largest cavity at birth and that it retains this relative size in regard to the other nasal sinuses. In my experience it has been the seat of infection much more frequently than have the other nasal sinuses.

Attention has been drawn to infection of the nasal sinuses in children by one or several of the following symptoms: Profuse nasal or postnasal discharge, cough, persistent mouth breathing after tonsil and adenoid removal (Case 1), pale face and lips, running ear, otitis externa, mastoiditis2 poor appetite, recurring bronchitis,3 pneumonia and asthma, (Case 5), pleuritis, headaches, loss of appetite, mental hebitude, chorea and nervousness, arthritis4 chronic pharyngitis, facial acne, conjunctivitis, both phlyctenular and interstitial keratitis5 swelling of the cervical lymph

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