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April 1923

A STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF THE CAUSES OF PALPABLE LYMPH GLANDS IN THE NEW-BORN

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS
Contribution from Asbury Hospital, Minneapolis, and Department of Anatomy, University of Minnesota.

Am J Dis Child. 1923;25(4):319-337. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1923.01920040064007
Abstract

The variation in the number of discernible lymph nodes in the new-born has given rise to divergent views concerning the normal occurrence. The epidermis and subcutaneous tissue of an infant are so thin and soft that a nerve or artery, a bony protuberance or tendon can readily be misinterpreted as an enlarged gland. External factors, such as coryza, infection and fever, influence the relatively unstable system of the new-born and bring about enlarged lymph nodes. Prenatal factors, such as syphilis, must also be considered. The purpose of this study is to analyze, in a carefully controlled group of cases, some of the manifold causes which give rise to the palpable glands of the new-born. We are grateful to the Asbury Hospital, Minneapolis, for cooperation in the collection of material, and we are also indebted to Drs. R. E. Scammon and W. P. Larson for their valuable suggestions.

The results of

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